Book Picks from SBL

Like many others, I did not have too many books on my list of things to pick up.

Here are my ‘picks’ from SBL

Mike Gorman’s Elements of Biblical Exegesis, revised and expanded (Hendrickson). This is one of the best exegetical textbooks and is written in a simple, but comprehensive way that covers all major steps of interpretation. Three new elements made this appealing for me to pick up in this new version: (1) Gorman has added a new section on ‘theological intepretation’. I will write a separate post on this. (2) Gorman has included three real exegesis papers by students in the appendix of the book, including one OT one. (3) The excellent annotated bibiliography has been updated. This is invaluable for exegesis students.

J. Neyrey and Eric Stewart’s Social World of the NT: Insights and Models (Hendrickson). Dealing with issues related to institutions (kindship, patron-client, economics), culture (honor, purity, gender, space, healing, etc…) and modal personality, this collection of programmatic essays from many well-known scholars (Neyrey, Elliott, Oakman, Pilch, Rohrbaugh) is a great resource. This would make a good textbook, but it also works for reference purposes.

S. McKnight and G. Osborne’s The Face of NT Studies (Baker, 2004). This is not a new book, but it is an amazing resource for prospective PhD and current research students. Because NT is so fragmented in terms of research specialities, it is necessary to be informed of the current debates and issues in other areas when a Paul person, for instance, dares to make a comment about John or Hebrews. I will dedicate a full post to this book later.

David deSilva’s The Sacramental Life: Spiritual Formation Through the Book of Common Prayer (IVP).  David is a friend of mine and I really like what he does.  Starting from the Anglican Book of Common Prayer, and tries to offer a spiritual and theological reading of it to bring revitalization to the protestant church and especially ‘low’ church life by showing how this ancient book offers invaluable guidance and devotional riches.  More on this later.

Greg Beale’s We Become What we Worship (IVP).  This biblical theology of idolatry is a very important topic, also recently taken up by Brian Rosner.  Beale’s strong background in biblical theology, intertextuality, and apocalyptic literature makes him eminently qualified to undertake this project.  More also on this.

NB: I did hope to pick up Fitzmyer’s 1 Corinthians (Anchor/Yale), but it was not out yet.  Also, like many others, I was anxious to the see the Hays FS which sold out quite quickly.  Oh well.  I have enough to read for now anyway!